What Happens if You Get into a Car Crash in Another State?

The last thing that anyone expects is to have a car crash in another state. Whether you are visiting another state for business or for a vacation, a car accident can cause many different types of complications. Having a car accident in unfamiliar territory with a different set of state laws may make you ever more stressed and anxious. Learn more about your legal rights following a car crash in another state below.

Car Insurance Coverage in Another State

Every state has a different set of minimum standards that all drivers must maintain regarding their car insurance coverage. While every state has different minimum standards, your car insurance will likely cover the standards of all states. This means that if you travel to a different state that has higher financial threshold limits for both personal or property damage, your car insurance will (in most cases) provide you that minimum level of coverage under your policy. Always take the time to read your actual policy as well as visit with a representative to make certain of all of your coverages and legal rights. If you ever have any questions regarding a discrepancy between what the insurance company representative is telling you and what you believe your policy covers, consulting with an experienced personal injury attorney can ensure that your rights remain protected.

No-Fault Insurance States

Again, every state has a different set of rules and regulations regarding car insurance. No-fault insurance states are ones in which the insurance policy of the victim must pay for injuries and losses suffered by that victim. This is the case even if the victim was the responsible party that directly caused the accident. The states that are considered “no-fault” insurance states are Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Utah. If you experience an accident in one of these states, visiting with an attorney can help you better understand the process by which you have a legal right to receive compensation from your own insurance company.

Differences Between Comparative Fault and Contributory Negligence

States have different ways of also handling fault and responsibility with respect to car accidents. Some states have a comparative fault standard, while others have a contributory negligence standard. These are complicated legal standards, and some states allow a victim to still receive compensation for their injuries even though they are partially responsible for the accident, while other states indicate that a victim must only remain less than 50 percent responsible for the accident tin order to receive compensation.

Contact an Experienced Car Accident Attorney

While you may have an insurance policy that will cover the injuries and losses of others if you were negligent in a car accident, there are also many circumstances in which you will also be able to receive compensation for your injuries and losses. You could still be awarded damages from your own insurance company, even if you were partially to blame for your accident. Every state has specific laws, and in order to better understand your legal rights, contact an experienced car accident attorney at The Law Office of Daniel H. Rose at 415-946-8900 or online today.